2015 Geneva motor show – the top six yellow cars

At DTW we pride ourselves on our rigorous analysis and our capacity to separate the news from the hype. 

2015 BMW M4 in pale yellow-gold. It´s almost pearlescent and, frankly, a bit aftermarket. If you are going to do yellow, don´t get cold feet at the last moment.
2015 BMW M4 in pale yellow-gold. It´s almost pearlescent and, frankly, a bit aftermarket. If you are going to do yellow, don´t get cold feet at the last moment.

Having looked at literally hundreds of thumbnail-sized photos I have been able to sort out the top six yellowest cars from all the other cars that weren´t yellow. I had to be careful though as one yellow car that came up in the search was from 2014. I didn´t include that.  By the way, one of these cars, the Mila Plus, is the work of Magna, the Austrian Tier 1 supplier.

In at number six (above) we have the BMW M4 coupe. It´s really busy, this car. The last version was clean and almost Italianate (when the Italians don´t do that any more). I found myself admiring the outgoing car but this one seems like the aftermarket guys from the year 2028 have got to the car already. Is BMW trying to pre-empt the horrible body kits this car will one day be fitted with?

In at number five is the Pininfarina Sergio. In many ways this is far nicer than anything Ferrari now make. I could be persuaded to be seen in this whereas the red cars would make me feel as embarrassed as standing buck naked at someone´s funeral.

...yellow and black make for a high contrast. If you ask, Pininfarina can paint the bonnet yellow too.
…yellow and black make for a high contrast. If you ask, Pininfarina can paint the bonnet yellow too. The Pininfarina Sergio.

At four is what looks like a digital rendering. The on-lookers do look puzzled while the man on the left looks like he is regretting something.

2015 VW CC concept. This was more of a gold colour but still, at the yellow end of the spectrum. Yellow with a twist.
2015 VW CC concept. This was more of a gold colour but still, at the yellow end of the spectrum. Yellow with a twist.

At number three we have one of the few Lamborghinis we have ever shown at this site.

2015 Lamborghini Hurracan. No chrome. Just yellow paint on evertything except the glass.
2015 Lamborghini Hurracan. No chrome. Just yellow paint on everything except the glass and wheels. Flat, isn´t it? Like a 1:25 model blown up to 1:1 exactly.

And number two is…

2015 Opel Adam Grand Slam.
2015 Opel Adam Grand Slam.

And the most yellow car on view at Geneva this year is the Magna Mila Plus. Again, more appealing than Ferrari and all other supercars now on sale. This has shades of the nice sculpting done in the 70s in Detroit. I get the feeling this was hand-crafted.

2015 Magna Mila Plus. If Apple want someone to build a car in its entirety, Magna can probably do it.
2015 Magna Mila Plus. If Apple want someone to build a car in its entirety, Magna can probably do it. Thanks to autoevolution for the photo. The accompanying article is good.

There wasn´t room on the list for another car so it has to be shown here, the one that didn´t make the cut, the seventh most glaring example of a yellow show car:

2015 Ford Mustang GT
2015 Ford Mustang GT: go to autoevoltion.com to read about this. They have some good photos. The yellow is slighlty white and milky, no? It´s a flat yellow not wholly unlike the mimosa yellow MB used in the 70s.

And this also didn´t get onto the list (proving that we didn´t just look at six yellow cars and write them down in random order):

Facelifted Nissan Juke. Yellow with a hint of red. I really like this car in this colour.
Facelifted Nissan Juke. Yellow with a hint of red. I really like this car in this colour.

Author: richard herriott

I like anchovies. I dislike post-war town planning.

10 thoughts on “2015 Geneva motor show – the top six yellow cars”

  1. I just want to support the comments regarding the BMW 4 Series vs. 3 Series Coupe of yore. The 3C was indeed italianate (a very carefully chosen and accurate description); it had a delicacy that made it most un-germanic and, actually, un-BMW. BMW’s approach these days seems to mean that its “DNA” is worn in bold on the sleeve of every car it makes, whereas Bangle managed to make its cars distinctive without everything having to be uniform. Time continues to reinforce the man’s genius … that and the banality of his successor’s oeuvre

  2. Humble pie for me. At the time I hated Bangle´s cars (or whoever actually did them). The current crop is banal – I doubt I´ll get to like these with the passage of time. I might make exceptions for the cars the public hate, the GT3 and GT5 but my perceptions are coloured by the fact I have seen this with some nice interior trims. I wonder did they intend to make the last 3 coupe look Italian or was it an accident. Some of its surface panels have that flat, 60s style I like in old Fiats, Alfas and Lancias (the Fulvia springs to mind). This reflects my obsessions more than objective fact.

  3. Oh dear, I’m actually rather fond of the 4 series coupé… and, to make matters worse, never really liked the E90 Three in any of its various variants.
    That being said, van Hooydonk’s output is obviously lacking the lightning factor of Bangle’s work. Not that there are many good excuses for the original X3 or the E65 Seven, but for every abomination, there was an E85 Z4 or an E60 Five series.
    That being said, I find the 4’s roofline enormously pleasing, the current cockpit architecture agreeable and the i range positively challenging. It’s just a pity that it’s mainly the onslaught of ghastly SUVs that’s most visible among the current crop of Beemers.

  4. I am inclined to agree. Is there anything about it at all that points one in the direction of a 7 series? I mean, the GT5 makes the 7 rather redundant. Yet according to the journos the GT5 is “pointless”. Fan as I am of saloons, the hatchback format of the GT5 makes it super useful yet still evidently a really cushy car to be in, front and back. If the 7 were a better attempt at a saloon I might reconsider. As it stands it´s excessive and not in a fun way. I wouldn´t want on my driveway (if I had a driveway).

    1. I’m finding it hard to find anything worthwhile about the F01 Seven – despite the general consensus being that we don’t need no other luxury saloon besides the S-class. In my opinion, there is a space for a sporting (Seven), elegant (XJ) and even technocratic (A8) variation of the decadent saloon. The problem is that the current Seven – as well as today’s A8, by the way – are failing to offer anything noteworthy. Where, in the BMW’s case, is the relatively compact, agile stance as embodied by the Spada-styled E32? Where is the litheness that makes the E38 such a welcome sight on today’s roads? At least the E65 stood out and, misguided as it was, did things differently. But I’m lost for arguments in favour of the F01 and would much rather be seen in a tatty old E23 – I car I never really cared about.

  5. I’m sure there’s nothing wrong with the 7 series. But like you said the 5GT beats it for practicality and interior space, and it seems just as well appointed inside.
    On the outside I’d go as far as saying that it has more presence than the 7. I’m particularly fond of the front 3/4 view, which to me looks incredibly well balanced and purposeful.
    Sorry it looks like yellow paint is not an option so this picture will have to do:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s