20 thoughts on “Geneva Bites – Japanese Concepts: The Ugly”

  1. 100% agree, this teaser concept is a horror. I used to so admire Honda, now look at it. It’s a modern tragedy.

  2. Plot lost about sums it up for Honda, not only the Civic. Very sad. It used to be my Japanese favourite.

  3. It used to be very much favourite – the late 90s especially. They had a beautifully consistent range. Now? One abomination of the other inside and out. And then they wonder why they can’t keep Swindon running at full clip. Bless.

  4. It is all very distressing. I constantly maintain that Honda lost its soul on 5 August 1991, even though Soichiro had demitted executive involvement long before.

    European sales have plummeted, and they don’t seem to care. The only car designed with even a nod towards Europe is the Civic, a whited supulchre bought mainly by the aged and oafs.

    The styling is like something from science fiction, the engineering beneath is way behind even what Opel are doing. I don’t expect much better from its successor, which – going by the concept – looks like a five door version of the horrible-looking coupe already on sale in the USA.

  5. The new Civic saloon (with a boot) is on sale here in North America already. Made in Canada. It has a much simpler front fascia and lights, no doubt for cost reasons, but the basic shape remains. We are advised that a hatchback for worldwide consumption, all being made in Swindon to efficiently utilize the factory capacity, will be here soon. Pictures show this thing here. Oh goody. There is no coupe on sale currently – the previous one was styled as competently as a grocery store own brand ice-cream carton. Plain cannot begin to describe it.

    The new coupe will look like this hatchback with a chopped wheelbase.

    Unlike the UK, the Civic sells well in Canada, the best selling car for 17 straight years. Why? Because it’s rugged and lasts. No surprises. No rusting, a durable good and it’s a cheap C$25K on the road for the most common model. Everyman’s car. But it’s an utter dog to drive compared a Mazda3.

    An upscale Civic is sold as the Acura ILX. It is uncompetitive with the Audi A3 in every way bar reliability and boot capacity.

    No diesels from Audi anymore. Honda has never sold diesels here. Yes Honda lost their mojo about 20 years ago. It coincided with being the last major manufacturer to switch to galvanised sheet tin. Correlation? You decide. Ahem.

    1. Was the not the third last Accord quite nice? That places loss of Mojo around 2006.
      If we were being charitable we could mention the FCV. That was within living memory, circa 2010?
      Generally, I´d agree. Honda is not what it was and the Civic is simply bizarre but not in the French way where this is method underlying the apparent zaniness. The Civic is just plain odd and I can´t see any reason for this.

  6. Note the meaningless chrome upper window frame, as odd as a bald man with a huge beard. Chrome frames should be complete or on the lower edge of the window or they look upside-down.

    1. I do. Furthermore, it’s an opinion grounded in the fullest consideration of the strengths and weakness of every other possible opinion I could hold on the topic.
      Being a little more serious,a metal strip is most needed on the lower window rubber not on the top. Why place protection where it is needed least?

    2. Why indeed? I was just curious to have you expand on this point and was wondering whether the right place was determined by purely visual considerations and what the criteria were.
      I have to say I do pay more attention to the use of chrome/brightwork since you started mentioning it on a regular. Particularly on the Opel Astra.

    3. It´s a fair point. I think they put brightwork on rubber to keep it from curling and to keep it in position better and discovered it looked good. Also, I think a long time ago there were flanges around the window apertures which neeed protection and shiny metal strips did the job. Guttterless window did away with that in the late 80s. The need for protected rubber strips remained though Mercedes and Volvo proved very good at making this unneccessary. If one is going to be functionalist about it, the brightwork on the upper part of the frame is just a nod to the old days. The strip along the bottom of the window seems to have some functional justification as well as looking prettier. Now I come to think of it, a bright strip runnning along the waistline looks less top heavy than an inverted arch of chrome running over the top. It´s something I might need to produce a diagram on. I am glad the subject has raised your awareness. I think knee-jerk hatred of chrome and uquestioning adoration are extreme and the interest lies in the middle: chrome or no chrome on a case by case basis. I tend to find some brightwork helps and it probably always should be optional to let the customer decide.

    4. There’s no chrome on my car, and the rubber strips at the bottom of the windows are covered in moss. Both suit its character.

    5. There´s a car that is not asking for brightwork. It´s a super neat bit of work, that car. There was a very spanky version of the Vento, a Passat-rivalling velour interior with armrests and headrests and fine alloys. That one didn´t need brightwork either. Ditto the Peugeot 306.

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