Connect the Dots : 2

After I tried my hand at formulating a little quiz, I had a go at another one. 

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This time the link is a little simpler. The three cars are the 1981 De Lorean DMC12, the 1981 Triumph Acclaim and the 1981 Bitter SC. The year of launch is not the required answer. All of them are quite lovely in their own way: that’s another thing that’s not the required answer. I wanted to find a matching DMC but they only seem to come in one colour.

Credits: 1981 Bitter SC; 1981 Triumph Acclaim; 1981 De Lorean DMC-12.

Author: richard herriott

I like anchovies. I dislike post-war town planning.

25 thoughts on “Connect the Dots : 2”

  1. They are all different cars under the skin. The Bitter is an Opel Senator. The Triumph is a Honda Ballade. The De Lorean is a Renault Dauphine. (at least I think that’s what is says in Wikipedia)

  2. Maggie.

    The Bitter was launched in 1979, the same year Thatcher came to power. The Acclaim represented the first fruits of BL’s tie-up with Honda that would come to define ARG throughout Thatcher’s tenure. And of course, the DeLorean entailed taking Mrs T for a cool hundred million.

  3. What a super set of answers but not the one I was looking for. Stradale´s is thematic and would make a super article. Markus shames me by the fact I did not notice they were the “last of their kind”. I am not sure if Sean Patrick is making that bit up about the Renault….

    1. Would I lie to you Richard? For instance didn’t I tell you that involvement with DTW would be a fast-track to the top table of motoring journalism?

      John De Lorean ran Pontiac for a time. Soichiro Honda had a Pontiac Firebird he was very fond of whose styling is reflected in a predecessor of the Honda Ballade, the 1300. The Triumph Acclaim is really a Honda Ballade. Michelotti had styled various earlier Triumphs and he also worked with Bitter on the SC’s detailing.

  4. Did they all use magnesium alloy for their window surrounds? Did Nuccio Bertone supply wheel designs for each of them? Did they all come supplied with tape players featuring auto reverse? Come on Richard, I am literally dying to know the answer.

    1. What a very versatile transmission. Also fitted to the Grumman postal van I see. Was it more of a generic title, with boxes from vehicle to vehicle varying in spec?

  5. I’ll give this my poor best.

    John Z DeLorean became President of Pontiac in 1965 on the strength of the Pontiac GTO – he chose the name, and played a part in its development. The last car to carry the Pontiac GTO name was a re-badged Holden Monaro, sold in the USA from 2004-2006, and a descendant of the Opel Senator, on which the Bitter SC is based.

    The year before the last GTO was launched, Erich Bitter presented the CDII, a revival of his first car, the Chuck Jordan styled CD sold from 1973. The CDII was based on a Monaro platform.

    The Bitter SC’s predecessor was the CD. ‘CD’ is also the designation of the top of the range Triumph Acclaim.

    1. That’s quite a good James Burke-style chain of connections, quite like my first trio of cars. It mixes solid connections with tenuous ones. My use of Cadillac/Mitchell/Corvette designer was my weak link. In yours it’s the CD badge. Otherwise, I think it’s mostly more direct than my Cadillac/Minx/406 chain. It’s quite a good parlour game, no?

  6. I saw a Triumph Acclaim just once in my life, many years ago while on holidays in the UK, so i could be wrong, yet i distinctly remember that the drivetrain was all-Honda. The auto-box should have been an Hondamatic H3 if my memory doesn’t fail me. However, i’m sure it wasn’t a GM TH-180 as this box is for RWD applications only.

    However, The TH-180 had an interesting application that i was unaware of.

  7. VAZ 2106, or thereabouts. That glovebox fit is nearly as bad as my BMW E36.

    Assuming that Richard (H) has not spiked Wikipedia as part of the game, the Acclaim GM TH180 is an honest error. BL branded the Acclaim’s auto option ‘Triomatic’ although it was a regular Hondamatic H3 out of a crate from Japan. The confusion probably arises from Holden’s branding of the Woodville, SA-built TH180 as the Tri-Matic.

    The DeLorean used a Renault 4141, all their own work, as far as I know.

  8. I’d been pondering how this box could have been quite so versatile. Who is volunteering to brave Wikipedia and put this right? Jimmy Wales was asking for some of my money again the other day. Had I donated this time, I’d be asking for a refund.

  9. Oh, bother. Further research shows the Acclaim had a Honda unit with a similar name. This is so disappointing. Apart from that connection the Acclaim is out on its own.
    The Delorean had a PRV 6-cylinder engine but used the 4141 Renault gearbox. I’d forgotten the PRV engine had been deployed there.
    The Strasbourg gearbox page at Wikipedia is not very good then, is it? Silly me for not double-checking.

  10. … congratulations to Roberto and Robertas for spotting and explaining.
    Right, the new solution is that all three cars are subject to inaccurate description Wikipedia.

  11. Thank you Richard!

    And you are right Robertas, that is indeed a VAZ Ziguli with an automatic transmission, standard cars were converted by the importers in the Netherlands. I wonder if the heavy clutch (i learned to drive in a Ziguli a couple of decades ago, they were very popular in Chile in the 80’s) could have been the drive to do the conversion.

    I will fix the Wikipedia entries as soon as i get home

  12. What a let down. 2016 has been a disappointment on any number of levels and this quiz is the cherry on the cake. Frankly I don’t think I will ever recover.

    1. The only approach I can take to this disaster is to redouble my efforts to double-down on striving to intend to ensure trying to raise the standard of research.

    2. Don’t worry Chris. I just read in Wikipedia that the EU Referendum voted 52% to 48% in favour of Remain and Donald Trump lost the election by 74 votes. And David Bowie’s got some more concerts lined up.

  13. My next quiz is on firmer ground.
    There’s some Archie Vicar material at Wikipedia. Luckily Archie’s technical data is in accord with the contemporary publications of the day that were on sale at the same time.

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