Geneva 2018 Reflections – Song to the Sybil

Continuing his review of the 88th Geneva motor show press days, Kris Kubrick consults with the oracles at GFG Style.

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Last week, we presented the CAD-rendered images of GFG Style’s newest concept. GFG is the latest business venture of perhaps the World’s most famous (certainly most influential) car designer following his surprise departure from the VW-owned Ital Design, a carrozzeria now rendered doubly irrelevant.

The Sybilla concept was reviewed here in less than eulogistic fashion and to be fair, the official images were anything but inspired. But viewing in the metal is what counts, and our man on the ground, to his surprise, found himself rather taken with what he found.

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Likening the car’s “very good” surfacing to that of VW, “three years ago!”, he told us; “Sybilla is far more appealing than the renders suggested. Chinese front apart (and even that could be worse), it’s refreshingly restrained. It’s no Giugiaro for the ages, but it wipes the floor with anything the Germans brought along.”

Kris went on to describe the Sybilla as “quite surprising in quite a lot of ways. It’s a lot larger than it appears in the photos and given Giugiaro’s penchant for packaging, I presume its for a purpose but I couldn’t see the car in enough depth – only the front canopy was open – so I don’t really know the reasoning behind its packaging”. However, he did note that the interior appeared to his eyes, “a bit digital brougham.”

While something of a self-confessed and unapologetic proponent of the great man’s work, Kris was at pains to retain impartiality. Nevertheless, the renders which provided a backdrop to the GFG stand had our correspondent in full-on kleptomaniac mode. “They used these to decorate the stand – what a delight!”

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Meanwhile at Giorgetto’s former stomping ground of Ital Design, the creative gulf yawns ever wider. In addition to the Pop.Up Next flying-drone concept, co-developed with Airbus and Audi, they Showed an open version of the 2017 Zerouno concept, dubbed Duerto which attracted the savage ire of our embedded reporter.

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“I detest this piece of crap. This is awful in so many ways I cannot be bothered to count them.”

Whatever one’s view of the Sybilla, it seems at least to be a cohesive piece of styling, even if it is neither terribly original nor particularly daring. Mind you, in the current climate, producing something which doesn’t scream naked aggression or outright flight of fancy can realistically be deemed an act of radicalism. And perhaps even something of a success.

More Auto-Didaktic Geneva impressions can be found here

Author: Eóin Doyle

Founding Editor. Content Provider.

One thought on “Geneva 2018 Reflections – Song to the Sybil”

  1. The Zerouno is indeed awful.

    Perhaps the worst thing about it is the disingenuous presentation. Billed as a very limited run bespoke supercar for ‘visionary enthusiasts’, it is painfully obvious that it’s a rebodied Audi R8 with a starting price that would buy 10 copies of the donor car.

    Presumably, this kind of deception is designed to present the car as a great investment proposition, which makes it even more loathsome.

    I remember the supercar glut of the early 1990s and how that came crashing down, with customers taking the extraordinary step of suing Jaguar to get out of their XJ220 orders. The ‘classic’ car market is a lot more bouyant and sophisticated these days, but surely this nonsense cannot last?

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