The All-Time Top 50 Cars: Number 6

Humber was the quintessential lower upper-middle class brand. Their 1967 Super Snipe epitomised the Rootes Group’s attempt to dissect Britain’s fading class system and sell something targeted very precisely.

Humber Super Snipe Series V: simoncars.co.uk
So the did the ’66 and ’65, but the ’67 seemed the best of the range. Humber Super Snipe Series V: simoncars.co.uk

In 1958 when Britain’s class system was alive and well, the Super Snipe name re-emerged on a gracious, stately car that offered space and grandeur if not much pace for less than the price of a Jaguar and with none of the raffish connotations of a Triumph saloon. Perhaps only Rover offered a similar sort of small mansion-on-wheels-feeling. Continue reading “The All-Time Top 50 Cars: Number 6”

Press Photo For The Day: 1964 Humber Super Snipe

I originally viewed Humber’s Super Snipe and Imperial cars as objects of derision. As time goes by I find them more and more likeable. I wonder what causes that change in sentiment?

1964 Humber Super Snipe
1964 Humber Super Snipe

At the time of writing (December 11, 2014) I am pondering spending a whole €12 on a classic cars magazine just to obtain someone else’s half-digested wisdom on the Imperial. These cars aren’t well documented so I may very well take the plunge though I have sworn off classic car magazines for several years. Continue reading “Press Photo For The Day: 1964 Humber Super Snipe”

Theme : Facelifts – A Facelift Before the Funeral

A facelift is sometimes an indication that all is far from well with the car’s manufacturer.

1964 Humber Super Snipe
1964 Humber Super Snipe

In 1958 Humber cars introduced a new body style which was sold under the Hawk and Super Snipe labels. The Super Snipe was the more expensive of the two. For the last word in Humberness, there was the Humber Imperial which was the same as a Hawk and a Snipe in terms of the bodywork but which had “a vinyl roof, automatic transmission and hydrosteer power steering as standard… electrically adjustable rear shock absorber settings, a rear heater and optional West-of-England cloth-trimmed seats”. That West of England cloth was fitted by Thrupp and Maberley***. These details matter. Continue reading “Theme : Facelifts – A Facelift Before the Funeral”

1967 Humber Super Snipe Review

“Uncommon the twain!” In what is probably a purported period review, the motoring writer Mr. A. Vicar considers the choices of car afforded to varietists enjoying a moderately higher-than-average income.

The super Humber Super Snipe
The super Humber Super Snipe

[From “The Motoring and Driving Register”, July 1967. Photography by Cyril Leadbeater. Owing to the poor quality of the original images, stock photos have been used.]

This month’s motor vehicle comparison pits two well-established players against one another. For the gentleman of comfortable means life affords choice and what is choice if it is not among things that differ? What point is there in being offered a large range of very similar cars for a similar price as many makers seem to want to do these days? That is no choice at all. We can see at the more pedestrian end of the market – and indeed have done for some time now- that many car builders are merely shadowing one another so that were one to sit inside a Ford, a Vauxhall, an Austin, or a Hillman selling for, say, £800, one could not Continue reading “1967 Humber Super Snipe Review”