A Company Car

With Ford poised to officially reveal its spiritual successor, we examine the car which fifty years ago paved its path, becoming the fifth best selling car of all time.

Image credit: viaretro

It’s a curious choice of name when you think about it, connotating little by way of glamour or allure, unlike for instance its Cortina sibling. The car as companion perhaps? A no-nonsense non-specific name for what began as a practical, utilitarian no-nonsense car.

The Escort name in fact predated this model, first turning up on a variant of the 1950s British Ford 100E range, but more salaciously, it was also the title of a popular UK top-shelf publication, beloved of the school playground and travel motel dweller alike.

But the Escort in basic form at least, was hardly going to Continue reading “A Company Car”

Up-selling Henry

With news that Ford’s upmarket Vignale line is falling below expectations, are the wheels already coming off the Blue Oval’s last chance saloon?

Mondeo Vignale. Image: premierford
Mondeo Vignale. Image: premierford

The key to viability in the European car market is finding ways to encourage customers to pay more. Easier said than done. According to a report last week in Automotive News, a JATO Dynamics analysis states the average UK customer pays £25, 400 for a mainstream brand D-segment car. By contrast, the average spend on a premium branded car of similar size was 36% higher.  Continue reading “Up-selling Henry”

Can’t You Just Let It Go?

Ford’s recent ad-campaign urges us to let go of what we know about the Blue Oval. It seems to be working, but maybe not as intended.

unlearn
This is no ordinary test drive… Image: macklinmotors

Superficially at least, Ford’s European fortunes appear resurgent, but leaving aside corporate spin and fatuous ad campaigns, there’s little substitute for a bit of hard data. So with this (and those commercials) in mind, it might be worth looking at Ford’s first quarter European sales figures to see what, if anything can be read from the metaphorical tea leaves. And sure enough, with two model lines holding top spot in their respective sectors, three in third place, and five individual lines posting notable percentage gains, there are reasons to be cheerful in Merkenich. Continue reading “Can’t You Just Let It Go?”

Didn’t We Cover This Quite Some Time Ago?

Over at Autocar they are still getting to grips with unlearning Ford: forget the Focus, Fiesta, Mondeo, Granada, Capri and … the Maverick? Cougar? Fusion?

1976-1979 Ford Taunus 2.3 Ghia.
1976-1979 Ford Taunus 2.3 Ghia.

Eoin treated this topic in February. If you want to re-read it – and I suggest you do – you’ll find another angle than the one taken by Autocar. Matt Prior’s article finishes with these words which I will quote here: Continue reading “Didn’t We Cover This Quite Some Time Ago?”

What Does Ford Want Us To Unlearn?

Ford wants the European market to see them differently. Perhaps they could start by being different?

Take it all back. Unlearn. Image: Ford UK
Take it all back. Unlearn. Image: Ford UK

I once watched professional cyclist, Peter Sagan being interviewed during the Tour de France. Asked what would prevent him winning the green (points) jersey in that year’s race, he rather naively replied; unluck. In fairness to Sagan, (who’s from Slovakia), he wasn’t speaking in his own language and we all understood what he was getting at. Which brings me to Ford’s new advertising slogan: Unlearn. By definition, in order to unlearn something, we must first undo the process of learning; to rid our minds of previously held orthodoxies and notions. Continue reading “What Does Ford Want Us To Unlearn?”